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Conference Program ( Download doc (376k))

Thursday 29 June 2000 9.00 – 10.00am

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo (concurrent with keynote speakers)

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

Everyone Wins with Major Events and Tourism – Uniting Rural Towns

  • Communication strategies – building links
  • Tourism packages
  • Trading smart – share the load
  • New initiatives to assist rural businesses
  • Overview of tourism and events in Latrobe

Mrs Janiene Ayre, Major Events Development Officer, Latrobe City

Mrs Michelle Toppin, Tourism Development Officer, Latrobe City

CLT

40

Regional Tourism and its Economic Development Links for Small Communities

  • Potential for small town growth with tourism
  • Experiences in B.C., Canada
  • Experiences in Florida, USA
  • Experiences in Victoria, Australia
  • Recommendations

Dr Peter Murphy, Head of Tourism & Hospitality, La Trobe University, Bundoora

CHAIR: STEPHEN YULE

CLT

20

Visions in Reality: Community Leadership as a Catalyst for Change

  • The workshop will use some of the most exciting content and processes from the Loddon Murray Community Leadership Program, to model its successful approach.
  • The workshop will increase awareness of the role of creative, courageous and confident community leaders and understanding of regional issues, resources, contacts and networks
  • A participative format with a holistic approach, a mix of learning styles and a range of experiences will be used to develop an appreciation of community diversity
  • There will be opportunities for workshop participants to explore their own leadership styles, values and beliefs.
  • Participants will reflect on and evaluate their leadership skills and strengths

Ms Janet Barker, Co-ordinator, Loddon Murray Community Leadership Programme, Loddon Murray 2000 Plus

Ms Val Wilkinson,
Individ-duality

2.15

40

Rural Leadership Training in Country Towns

  • South Australian Rural Leadership Program
  • Victorian successful Community Leadership Programs
  • Working in Groups training program
  • Successful models

Mr Nigel McGuckian, Principal Consultant, Rendell McGuckian

CHAIR: MARK MARSDEN

2.15

20

Thursday 29 June 2000 10.00 – 11.00am

(concurrent with keynote speakers)

Co-operate or Perish – assisting rural producers to adopt to changing markets

  • Challenges in the market place facing small agricultural producers
  • Co-operation amongst producers becoming increasingly necessary for survival
  • Exploring models for co-operative action
  • Case Studies and implications for future action and research

Mr Stephen Chaffey, Office of Rural Communities, Department of State & Regional Development

Mr Neville Anderson (as above)

CLT

40

Living Neighbourhoods – Empowering Communities to Change by Self-Organisation

  • Living Neighbourhoods began as a way to help people reduce the frustrations of the car - too much time, money etc.
  • When people realised they could make changes themselves in this area of their lives, they realised that they could make changes in the community as well.
  • The result was communities in which people (with a little initial help) created change – they are building their own playground, redesigning space outside a school, cleaning their own laneways, meeting new people, enjoying a safer community, realising their leadership qualities, and so on
  • The first 3 Living Neighbourhoods are in urban areas of South Australia and Queensland, but their characteristics are ideal for country towns and regions.

Ms Liz Ampt, Director, Steer Davies Gleave



CHAIR: CHRISTINE TOWES

CLT

20

Thursday 29 June 2000 2:15pm to 3:15pm

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

“From a Backward Drift to Steaming Ahead”

  • General community embracement of the need to act
  • ‘Future directions’ conferences to identify goals
  • Displaying our wares
  • Welcoming new enterprises into our community
  • Replanning

Dr Geoff Pritchard, Mayor, Tumut Shire Council

2.15

20

The Millennium 3 Community Regional Sustainable Development Project: A local action, sustainable development, model/pilot

  • ‘Dividing nation’ sustainability overview and reality check
  • Rural and regional Australia’s competitive advantages
  • Reinventing community cohesion (social, capital and assets)
  • Life skills development training (low tech / hand skills)
  • Creative, affordable, self help, regional housing provision

Mr Norm Cameron, Urban & Regional Planner, Central Goldfields Community (NGA)


CHAIR: ALEX BROWNLIE

2.15

40

Urban Salinity Management in Rural Western Australian Towns

  • Agriculture Western Australia’s role in salinity management
  • The Western Australian Salinity Strategy
  • State government/local government partnerships in salinity management
  • Salinity – a major threat to WA country towns
  • Solutions and opportunities in the management of urban salinity

Mr Mark Pridham, Project Manager, Agriculture Western Australia

2.32

20

Community Resources Management: One Piece of the Pie

  • The benefits of adopting integrated resource management in rural south-west Queensland communities
  • Establishing partnerships using the process of sub-catchment action planning
  • Key elements contributing to success include: (a) opportunities for personal development;
    (b) mechanisms to co-ordinate activities; (c) promotion and recognition of achievements;
    (d) support for and participation in a mutually agreed process for action

Ms Catherine Potter, Co-ordinator, Condamine Catchment Management Association Inc.

2.32

20

The Integrated Planning Act: Some Responses by Rural Local Governments

  • Integrated Planning Act – major aspects
  • Implications for rural Councils
  • Some positive aspects provided by the Act
  • Difficulties and problems for rural communities
  • Some case study responses

Mr Colin Higginson, Director, Colin Higginson Town Planners

CHAIR: NIGEL MCGUCKIAN

2.32

20

A New Partnership: The Capital City and Regional Victoria

  • Globalisation and regional Victoria
  • The role of the capital city in regional development
  • The need for a new partnership
  • What the City of Melbourne can do

Ms Sue Wilcox, Planning Unit Leader, The City of Melbourne

2.28

40

A strategic Partnership for Creating a New Region: The Strathbogie Example

  • Problems and issues in a local government area
  • Community profile
  • Strategic partnership with La Trobe University
  • Local Initiatives and future planning
  • Resource access with the University System

Ms Lynne Dore, Regional Tourism Co-ordinator, School of Tourism & Hospitality, La Trobe University Bundoora

CHAIR: ROB MILNER

2.28

20

Thursday 2:15pm to 3:15pm - continued

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

North Queensland’s Approach to Regional Development

  • Townsville Enterprise’s regional development working group
  • Key infrastructure for the North Queensland region
  • Infrastructure for regional communities
  • Government’s approach to regional development
  • North Queensland’s long term sustainable future

Mr Brian Beveridge, Mayor, Charters Towers City Council

2.30

40

A Recent Initiative in the Delivery of Government Services to Regional South Australia

  • Description of the State Government’s Service Centre initiative to create six service centres in country towns
  • Outcomes after 12 months of operation
  • Lessons

Mr Keith Harris, Chief Project Officer, Planning SA

CHAIR: RUSSELL TAIT

2.30

20

Business Clustering: Panacea or Placebo for Regional Australia

  • Clustering, co-location, networks, communities of practice
  • Comparison of Ballarat and Albury/Wodonga food cluster
  • Drivers of successful clusters
  • Policies that can work
  • Applications in other sectors

Professor Julian Lowe, Head, School of Business, University of Ballarat

Dr Paul Miller, Research Officer, University of Ballarat

CLT

40

Small Town Decline and Survival: Trends, Success Factors and Policy Issues

  • Key demographic and economic trends
  • What defines a ‘viable community’?
  • Which factors have led to decline in small towns?
  • Which factors have led to success?
  • Key issues for governments and communities

Mr Paul Collits, Manager – Policy, NSW Department of State & Regional Development

CHAIR: PAQUITA LAMACRAFT

CLT

20

Supermarkets: Scourge or Saviour? The paper examines three case studies of the impacts of supermarkets on country towns

  • Small rural towns are now being targeted by supermarkets
  • They are tending to locate outside the traditional main street
  • Competition is not on the basis of a level playing field
  • ‘Investment at all costs’ is a dangerous mantra
  • State and federal intervention is required

Mr Angus Witherby, Senior Lecturer, Geography & Planning University of New England

2.29

40

Competitive Communities? The Impact of Competitive Tendering on Country Towns and Rural Communities – Lessons from the Victorian Experience.

  • Findings of a study into the impact of CCT on rural and remote areas of Victoria.
  • Compulsory Competitive Tendering (CT) in Victoria has been the most radical and extensive of its type in the world and radically changed Local Government.
  • Impact of CCT on: local employment, social and economic fabric of small towns, regional development, small business, capacity of Councils to govern in the best interests of their community, long term viability of smaller Councils.
  • Highlights the fact the ‘global efficiency gains and cost savings’ can produce indirect negative impacts of far greater magnitude.
  • Structural reforms in government and public utilities are having a marked impact on smaller communities in Australia’s hinterland.

Mr Peter Tesdorpf, Principal, Peter Tesdorpf & Associates P/L, Consultants in regional development, urban affairs, planning & local government



CHAIR: JOHN HENSHALL

2.29

20

Is the Internet the Saviour of Bush Towns?

  • The Internet provides access and connectivity to the rest of the world on a two way basis
  • Access to the Internet in regional Australia: what ought to be
  • Access to the Internet in regional Australia: what is
  • Government policy and assistance – myth and reality
  • Initiatives from within – how regional centres can drive the changes

Mr George Fong, Director, Internet Society of Australia

Mr Tony Hill, Executive Director, Internet Society of Australia

McKay

30

How Your Town Can Use the Internet

  • Profile key issues country towns need to overcome
  • Profile major opportunities country towns need to capture
  • Discuss current situations/tools available through the Internet
  • Introduce organization solution
  • Setting priorities for ‘your’ country town – how to get started

Ms Catherine O’Connor, Manager, InFARMation


CHAIR: MATTHEW GOULD

McKay

30

Thursday 29 June 2000 3:30pm to 4.30pm

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

Establishing Multi-Industry Superannuation Funds to Retain Capital in Regional Australia

  • Retailing capital in the regions
  • Competitive returns and administration
  • Capacity to reinvest in the region
  • Establishing a track record
  • Regional Boards of Trustees

Mr Stephen Harrison, General Manager, Industrial Development Australia P/L

2.15

40

Community Interdependence: Developing our Preferred Future

  • Independence vs interdependence
  • The importance of community focus
  • Workshop on developing a community preferred future
  • Workshop addressing barriers/constraints to achieve this future
  • End results of the workshops (this workshop focuses on work done by Ouyen Inc., a community organisation in N/W Victoria

Mr Steven Vallance, Farmsmart Facilitator, Department of Natural Resources & Environment

CHAIR: IAN ABERNATHY

2.15

20

Progress Through Partnership

  • Creating ‘critical mass’ through partnering
  • Examples of partnership at work
  • Achieving the unachievable
  • The political environment for partnering

Mr Tom Lindsey, Director Economic Development, Warrnambool City Council

2.32

20

Strategic Partnership in the Rural Health Centre – What Does it Require?

  • ‘Partnerships’ are in vogue – but are they always a good idea?
  • What are the costs and benefits of partnering?
  • What are the critical success factors in making partnerships work?
  • What are the implications for rural communities of strategic partnering in the health area?

Dr Tom Keating, Pro Vice Chancellor, La Trobe University, Wodonga

CHAIR: PETER MARSHALL

2.32

40

Social Indicators of Rural Community Sustainability: An Example from the Woady Yallock Catchment

  • Social indicators
  • Rural Australia
  • Social / community sustainability
  • Stakeholders values – community needs assessment
  • Strategic planning

Ms Sharon Pepperdine, PhD Candidate, Dept. Geography & Environmental Engineering, University of Melbourne

2.28

20

Work Related Commuting in Victoria: A Regional Perspective

  • The Australian Bureau of Statistics Journey To Work (JTW) data is presented and discussed
  • In-commuting and out-commuting for work purposes in regional Victoria is examined
  • A simple model of commuting behaviour is presented on the JTW data
  • Estimates of commuting rates for non-JTW regions in Victoria are presented
  • Thematic maps of commuting characteristics are presented

Dr Graeme Byrne, La Trobe University, Bendigo

CHAIR: TREVOR LUDEMAN

2.28

40

The Ageing of Regional Victoria: Problem or Opportunity

  • Population ageing: Causes and characteristics
  • Ageing in Victorian regional areas: How does it differ from the metropolitan experience?
  • Future patterns of ageing in regional areas
  • Policy implications of population ageing for regional areas: Infrastructure and services
  • Issues and uncertainties of ageing in regional areas

Ms Fiona McKenzie, Senior Research Officer, Department of Infrastructure

2.30

40

Applying an Analytical Model for Assessing Community Sustainability: Preliminary results from Northern Australia Remote Towns

  • Definitions of ‘sustainability’ appropriate for country towns
  • Presentation of the analytical model
  • Brief review of research methods based on community attitudes
  • Review of results from six case study towns
  • Possible implications of the findings for other Australian towns

Mr Colin Macgregor, Lecturer, Tropical Environmental Studies & Geography, James Cook University

CHAIR: ESTHER KAY

2.30

20

Thursday 3:30pm to 4.30pm - continued

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

A Matter of Skill or Care? Bridging the Gap in Infrastructure Development in Regional Australia

  • Issues surrounding the provision of infrastructure in regional Australia
  • The role of the Australian Council for Infrastructure Development and a background to the Institutional Investment Information Service workshops in 1997 and 2000
  • Outcomes from the workshop including: the need to bridge the communication gap between investors and proponents; an alternative to the ‘big city’ approach to assessing projects; greater transparency in public funding; scale of regional economies vs the size of infrastructure projects
  • Did we use the correct methodology for the IIS seminars? Is it an issue of skill or scale? What conclusions can we draw? What did some of the case studies tell us?
  • The role of government and the private sector: How do we get a coordinated private and public sector approach to funding infrastructure development in regional areas?

Ms Claire Braund, The Regional Institute

CLT

40

Local Government and Regional Economic Development

  • Relationship between Rural Finance Corporation and local government
  • Regional development activities in a non urban local government area
  • Economic development in a predominantly residential area
  • Government and community working together to create sustainable economic development

CHAIR: GEOFF ANSON

Ms Sandra Bunce, Manager Economic Development Unit, Mount Alexander Shire Council

Matthew Gould, Manager Streetlife, DEET

Warren Vogel

CLT

20

Access to and Quality of Services in Remote Rural and Regional Towns

  • Covers recent population developments in remote rural and regional Australia
  • Analysis of (a) access to services, businesses and community infrastructure, (b) quality and range of access, and (c) change in quality of services, businesses and community infrastructure in remote rural and regional towns

Mrs Kate Brinkley, Bureau of Rural Sciences

Dr Gerald Haberkorn, Bureau of Rural Sciences

McKay

40

Using Sustainability Indicators to Monitor Achievement of Sustainable Regional Development

  • The question is increasingly being asked? How can we measure whether we have a balance between environmental, economic and social outcomes in regional communities?
  • Key social, economic and environmental outcomes common to the State and local government agencies developed by a cross government working party in the NE Victoria region
  • Draft individual or grouped indicators which can be efficiently and effectively monitored to indicate progress in achieving these outcomes.
  • A consultancy has commenced to recommend how data from these indicators should be collected and presented; identify appropriate benchmarks for each indicator; and recommend processes for the agencies to individually and collectively use the data to improve decision making.
  • If implemented, benefits of this project to stakeholders of having historical evidence and trend data to assist policy development, strategic planning, establishment of detailed action plans and better reporting of achievements of programs.

Mr David Blore, Regional Manager North Eastern Victoria, Department of Infrastructure

Mr Ian Ada, Program Leader, Department of Natural Resources & Environment



CHAIR: MAUREEN ROGERS

McKay

20

Thursday 29 June 2000 4.45pm to 5.45pm

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

The Politics of Rural Health

  • How did it get on the agenda?
  • Who’s playing?
  • Will it improve health outcomes?
  • What is the role of the NRHA?
  • Will there be a happy ending?

Mr Gordon Gregory, Executive Director, National Rural Health Alliance

2.32

20

Assisting Rural Communities Meet Their Urgent Care Needs

  • Elements of rural urgent care systems
  • Context of rural urgent care systems
  • Comumunity ‘burn-out’ and the need for tangible support
  • Using a community development approach to improve community capacity
  • Development of a Community Development Support Tool

Mr Peter O’Meara, Centre for Rural Health, Monash University

CHAIR: PHILLIP BUCKLE

2.32

40

South West Victoria: Farm or Park? Paddocks or Trees?

  • Growing communities from the inside out
  • Effect of timber plantations on rural South West communities
  • Community activities assisting development in the South West
  • The need for collective action
  • Individual and community needs

Mr Keith Jackson, Natural Resources & Environment

2.28

20

Successful Community Economic Development Initiatives in Western Australia

  • Community Wise: a manual and tool kit for communities
  • RRR – for women from rural, remote and regional WA
  • Wiluna – aboriginal economic development
  • Telecentres – providing advanced communication services to WA communities
  • Who Dares Wins – a snapshot of dynamic bush communities

Ms Christine Towes, Project Officer, Department of Commerce & Trade

CHAIR: JAN BOYNTON

2.28

40

A Partnership Approach from Two Agencies Working in Rural Communities to Support Change

  • History of a single activity in communities
  • A crisis in the economic base
  • Skilling to cope with change
  • United approach to a united way forward
  • The future

Ms Rosanne Sharpe, Regional Co-ordinator, Agriculture WA

Ms Jane Manning, Regional Development Officer, South West Development Commission

2.30

20

Decline & Revitalisation of Small Towns in the American Mid West

  • Housing – traditional and new
  • Retailing – main street vs strip development
  • Essential services in schools etc
  • Agriculture

Dr Gordon Forth, Director, Centre for Regional Development

2.30

20

We’re from the Government and We’re Here to Help: The Work of the BRS Social Sciences Centre in the Rural and Regional Policy Process

  • The role of the Bureau of Rural Sciences’ Social Sciences Centre
  • Key activities undertaken by the Social Sciences Centre
  • Why the policy development process needs to take account of rural social issues more effectively
  • Some examples of how our understanding of rural industry and community social factors can be improved

Kate Brooks & Nicole Cosgrove, Bureau of Rural Science

CHAIR: KIM McGOUGH

…Cont’d.

2.30

20

       

Thursday 4:45pm to 5:45pm - continued

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

The Triple Bottom Line for Sustainable Community Development

  • Triple bottom line – an industry perspective
  • Models for community renewal
  • Triple bottom line – its application in the community context
  • Economic opportunities that can surface through a sustainable development framework

Dr Maureen Rogers, La Trobe University, Bendigo

Ms Roberta Ryan, La Trobe University, Bendigo

CLT

20

The Development and Implementation of the Regional Development Policy of WA

  • The need for a regional development policy
  • The policy framework
  • The consultative process
  • Timeframes for development
  • The approval and implementation process, the findings

Mr Stephen Yule, Team Leader, Department of Commerce & Trade

CHAIR: CHARLES HICK

CLT

40

Competition or Collaboration: Local Economic Development, Sustainability and Small Towns

  • The agenda for local economic development is changing
  • An assessment of the community economic development process
  • Discussion of local economic development models
  • Sharing opportunities between communities
  • Competition between localities can be counterproductive

Dr Kevin O’Toole, Convenor, Politics & Policy Studies, Deakin University Warrnambool

CHAIR: TOM KEATING

McKay

40

       

Friday 30 June 2000 9.00am to 10.30am

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo (concurrent with keynote speakers)

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

Eugowra Rural Transaction Centre – An Australian First

  • How the community of Eugowra met the challenge
  • Why we need RTCs
  • The effect of the big event
  • Flow on to the community spirit
  • New uses for old banks

Ms Joy Engelman, Economic Development Officer, Cabonne Council

2.15

20

Welshpool & District Rural Transaction Centre – Leading the Way

  • The effect on a community when the bank leaves town
  • Coming up with some solutions
  • Mustering support for chosen project
  • Power of positive thinking – focusing on the final outcome and just doing what has to be done
  • The effect on a community when services are returned

Ms Trixy Allott, Welshpool & District Advisory Group, RTC Welshpool

CHAIR: VANESSA CRIMMINS

2.15

20

Vulnerability and Development; Assessment of Needs and Opportunities in the Context of Emergency Management

  • Identification of personal, family and community needs
  • Managing disaster recovery and community development
  • Experience and practice derived from recent disasters in Victoria
  • Methods for assessing vulnerability and resilience
  • Moving from vulnerability to resilience

Mr Philip Buckle, Manager, State Emergency Recovery Unit, Department of Human Services

2.32

30

Methods for Assessing Personal Group and Community Vulnerability and Resilience in the Context of Disasters in Victoria

  • Theory of vulnerability and resilience in the context of disaster management
  • Methods used to assess vulnerability and resilience in recent Victorian disasters
  • Methods and practice to support people and communities affected by disasters
  • Theory and methods of relevance from other areas of public and community activity (including land management, primary health, public health, community development and economic development
  • Moving from dependence to development

Mr Philip Buckle, Manager, State Emergency Recovery Unit, Department of Human Services


CHAIR: PHIL HANNA

2.32

60

Building Social Capital in Long Gully

  • Establishing a common vision
  • Building trust
  • Building social capital skills
  • Travelling at the community’s pace
  • Balancing process and outcomes

Ms Linda Beilharz, Community Development, St Luke’s Anglicare

2.30

20

My Town – A Town Responding to The Challenge of Change

  • A brief history of Boort
  • Why fight the inevitable?
  • Our future, our decision
  • Governments can help
  • Celebrating some wins

Mr Russell Malone, Chair, Boort Development Inc

2.30

20

Employment Challenge

  • Community consultations
  • Research into employment of economic development initiatives throughout Australia and overseas
  • Capacity of communities
  • Outcomes – projects such as Community Co-operatives / Enterprises and Building a Future for the Country

Mr Jeff Bothe, Executive Officer, Community Employment Council of Central Victoria

CHAIR: DEB HOWCROFT

2.30

20

Friday 9.00am – 10.30am – continued

Lights, Camera, Re-action. How Does Film-Induced Tourism Affect a Country Town?

Film as a promoter of a destination, intentional and unintentional: film-induced tourism

  • The potential of film-induced tourism to alter the ambience and make-up of the town/region in which it is filmed or based
  • How does a small rural community respond to change precipitated by such external forces?
  • Case study of the effect of the ABC series, Sea Change, on the Barwon Heads community
  • Has the tourism response to Sea Change divided the town?

Ms Sue Beeton, Lecturer, La Trobe University, Shepparton

2.28

20

Tourism Optimisation: Enrolling Communities in a Sustainable Future

  • What is the Tourism Optimisation Management Model?
  • What does it involve?
  • How does it operate in communities to optimise the benefits of tourism?
  • What are the benefits of the model, ie addresses tourism issues, enrols community vision, long term monitoring, builds community capital
  • What is required to implement such a model in other locations

Mrs Elizabeth Jack, Project Consultant, Tourism Optimisation Management Model

2.28

40

Positive Strategies for Maximising Effects of a Small Town Bypass: A Woodend Perspective

  • Developing community ownership and spirit
  • Emphasising the positives; eliminating negatives
  • Developing a co-ordinated approach
  • Creating partnerships with governments
  • Peculiarities of local situation

Mr Leon Stryker
Chairman, Woodend Alive Co-ordinating Committee

CHAIR: ALUN CHAPMAN

2.28

20

Capital Solutions for Regional Business

  • Overview of Bendigo Bank’s regional initiatives
    The Regional Development Fund
  • Investing in regional Australian businesses
  • Being an investment ready business

Mr Derek de Vrieze, Manager Regional Equity Markets, Bendigo Bank

CLT

20

Capital Solutions for Regional Business

  • What is the Bendigo Stock Exchange?
  • Creating investable opportunities in regional communities
  • Creating capital bridges between city and country

Mr Geoff Green, Director, Bendigo Stock Exchange

CLT

20

We Have Businesses in our Community That Have the Capacity and Desire to Grow, but Cannot Secure Traditional Finance. How Can We Assist?

  • What is Venture Capital?
  • Business Angels (Private Investors) – Who are they? What’s in it for them?
  • The benefits for the business
  • The benefits for the Business Angel(s)
  • North Coast Business Angels – a non-metropolitan, regional Business Angel model

Mr Rod Leane, Executive Officer, North Coast Business Angels

CHAIR: BARRY ACKERMAN

CLT

40

       

Friday 30 June 2000 11.00 to 12.30pm

Location: La Trobe University Bendigo

Title

Presenter

Room

Duration

(minutes)

Rural Councils – Rural Women – New Opportunities Web

  • Recognise the role women play in rural business and community development
  • Establish a network that encourages women to participate in rural development
  • Provide a forum for women to contribute to economic development in rural areas
  • Develop a model based around the above principles that can be transportable to other areas.

Mrs Michelle Toppin, Tourism Development Officer, Latrobe City

2.30

20

Planning for Ageing in the Home

  • The problems faced when houses are not planned for older people
  • The importance of integrated approach for planning for an ageing population
  • Mildura Rural City Councils proactive solution to this problem
  • Describing an information package which details how to plan for ageing
  • Illustrates how council can play a vital role in maintaining an ageing population’s independence and wellbeing

Mr Martin Hawson, Manager, Aged & Disability Services, Mildura Rural City Council

2.30

20

Innovation Awards – Simple Idea – Great Response

  • What was Cabonne Country’s idea?
  • Why did we undertake development?
  • Some of the ideas that evolved
  • What did Cabonne Country achieve?
  • Winning the big one!

Ms Joy Engelman, Economic Development Officer, Cabonne Council

2.30

20

Modular Burial Grave System (MBS). ‘Incorporating Tradition, Dignity and Aesthetics’

Evolution

  • Manufacturing process to specialist equipment
  • Incorporation into memorial gardens and memorialisation
  • Advantages / disadvantages of the MBS v traditional interment
  • Market potential of product and future direction

Mr Bradley Duke, Project Officer, Rockhampton City Council

2.30

20

Leadership Development is a key success factor for every community in Australia. The Leadership Maroondah program:

  • Involves participants from a range of backgrounds and age groups, and accommodates an equally diverse array of personalities
  • Successfully fosters pro-active volunteerism in every strata in your community
  • Retains commitment of graduates over a long period of time, by developing a unique bond between participants, Council and the community
  • Is fun, informative, worthwhile and beneficial to individual participants, Council, and both the business community and the community at large
  • Creates a special community resource, engenders creativity, courage and commitment from everyone involved.

Ms Helen Praeger, Project Officer, Maroondah City Council


CHAIR: LINDA HOLUB

2.30

20

“Deloraine”: A Town on a Mission

  • Deloraine – a tidy town
  • Deloraine – community of the year
  • Community service organizations
  • Deloraine – premier tourist town
  • Where to from here

Mr David Pyke, Executive Officer Governance, Meander Valley Council

2.15

20

The Alberton Project: A Community Redevelopment Program

  • Why is the project required? A reality check
  • What is the project? Community growth
  • Who is doing it? A consortium
  • What is the process?
  • What are the outcomes?

Mr David Cartledge, Project Manager, Alberton Project


CHAIR: IVAN SURRIDGE

2.15

20

Friday 11.00 to 12.30pm – continued

‘Diversification’: A Pathway to Prosperity?

  • Broadening your town’s economic base
  • Strategies and initiatives for change
  • Community participation in the change process
  • Dealing with structural change in two diverse communities: timber and mining
  • Who dares wins

Mr Alan Cross, Regional Development Officer, South West Development Commission

2.32

40

The Lang Lang Experience and Wellington Shire

  • Motivate the community
  • Establish the need
  • Set achievable strategies
  • Prioritise timeframes
  • Complete the process

Mr Allan Gurr, Tourism Officer (Streetlife Co-ordinator), Wellington Shire Council

CHAIR: PAUL CASEY

2.32

40

Urban Design Frameworks: A Strategy for Country Towns

  • What are ‘urban design frameworks’?
  • What do they offer country towns?
  • What they have offered Frankston/Bendigo and Falls Creek – as working examples

Mr Alun Chapman, Managing Principal, Hassell Pty Ltd

CLT

40

Designing for Revival Through ‘Town Pride’: Success Stories from the UK and Australia

  • Outline of recent initiatives for regeneration of British villages and small towns: Government programs, local initiatives, non-profit alliances and cross-sector partnerships. Lessons and potential for Australian towns
  • Application of strategic planning and urban design techniques to focus and channel energies in stimulating local communities and economies, whilst building responsive local networks
  • Recent Australian examples tapping ‘town pride’ to clarify and strengthen local identity, yielding physical, social and economic dividends.

Mr Rod Duncan, Senior Planner, Department of Infrastructure


CHAIR: STEPHANIE KNOX

CLT

40

Consulting With Young People: A Future Imperative

  • Exploring consultation strategy options
  • Getting the communications right
  • Practising empowerment and enabling participation
  • Hands on practicum
  • Following up actions

Mr Max Kau, Member, Talbot Task Force

1.39/

1.40

40

Doing it the Indigo Way. A Story of a Mouse That Roared

  • Impacts of amalgamation on a small Shire
  • Embracing the challenges presented by change
  • Establishment of Indigo Way based in a different town; trading separately to Council and administered by its own independent Board of Directors
  • Aggressive approach to tendering within and without Shire
  • A Model that has been considered as a possible future structure by many similar sized rural municipalities both in Victoria and Australia

Mr Peter O’Dwyer, Shire Planner, Indigo Shire Council (Indigo Way)

1.39/ 1.40

20

Strategies and Initiatives for Country Towns: Sale-ing Into the New Millennium – an Urban Catalyst Project for Sale

  • Maximising positive changes for the community of Sale
  • Creating a realistic vision for Sale
  • Developing catalyst projects to revitalise a country town
  • Genuinely engaging the local community in determining directions for the future

Ms Maria Koutsambasis, Urban & Environment Planner, Gutteridge, Haskins & Davey P/L

CHAIR: PETER BLACK

1.39/ 1.40

20

Friday 11.00 to 12.30pm – continued

Urban Design and Heritage: Positioning Small Towns

  • Architectural typology
  • ‘Positioning’ of regional towns
  • Information technology and country towns
  • Alternative view of heritage issues
  • The project management of urban design projects

Mr Paul Morgan, Director, Morgan McKenna Pty Ltd

2.28

20

Ilfracombe Shire, Central Western Queensland. The Role of Design and its Implementation as a Tool in the Planning Process

  • Identification of the planning context: Ilfracombe Shire and the Integrated Planning Act 1997
  • The planning process – development of the design policies
  • An overview of the town and rural design policy: aims, objectives and provisions
  • An overview of the signage policy: aims, objectives and provisions
  • Design policies, where to from here and its applicability to other rural towns

Mr Adam Davies, Town Planner, Colin Higginson Town Planners


CHAIR: ROBERT TOON

2.28

20

The Importance of Rural Development In the 21st Century – Persistence, Sustainability and Futures

Professor John Keller, Kansas State University

2.28

40

A Strategic Partnership for Creating a New Region: The Strathbogie Example

  • Problems and issues in a local government area
  • Community profile
  • Strategic partnership with La Trobe University
  • Local initiatives and future planning
  • Resource access within the University system

Ms Lynne Dore, Latrobe University Bundoora

2.29

20

Western Region Enterprise Network

  • People vs technology
  • Ownership and management
  • Co-operation, co-ordination and consistency
  • Regional Support Networks
  • Wealth generation enhances employment

Mr Peter Ziebell, Project Co-ordinator, Regional Connectivity Project

2.29

40

A Practice Based Approach to Enterprise Development

  • What is enterprise development?
  • Tools of enterprise development
  • Tendency to become overly focused on structure (form)
  • A diagnostic tool for helping entrepreneurs to fulfil their needs
  • Definition of ‘entrepreneurial need’
  • Diagnosing entrepreneurial needs
  • The nine obstacles to obtaining or using them
  • The diagnostic matrix tool

Associate Professor Tom Lyons, University of Louisville


CHAIR: NEVILLE SMITH

2.29

 

City of Greater Bendigo

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